4/19/2019

Warner Archive Collection Blu-ray Review: The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)


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If you're looking for mermaids, go fish... or rather don't as Rod Taylor learns the hard way when he catches Doris Day’s Jennifer Nelson by the tail in the opening scene of their 1966 follow-up to the wackadoo sex comedy Do Not Disturb, made just one year before.

But if you're searching for proof that everything old is new again, look no further than the Blu-ray release of the convoluted Cold War spy comedy The Glass Bottom Boat, which — in a timelier than ever plotline — finds America's sweetheart accused of working as a Russian spy.


An eccentric widow, faux mermaid for her father's tourism business, and campus tour guide at NASA’s Catalina Island Aerospace Research Laboratory, Nelson's habit of tricking her dog Vladimir into exercising by calling her home throughout the day and letting the ring is misconstrued as sending her "Soviet handler" a coded message.

Frequently pushing the audience’s suspension-of-disbelief close to or past the breaking point, Day vehicles have always thrived on sitcom style misunderstandings but Boat takes the practice to an epic new level.


Mixing veteran scribe Everett Freeman's jam-packed high concept script together with animator, gag-man, and frequent Jerry Lewis collaborator turned filmmaker Frank Tashlin's style of direction transforms The Glass Bottom Boat into the uniquest of Day films: a veritable live-action cartoon.

Featuring a red room and a blue room as well as costumes and sets of every shade in between, the Tashlin emphasis on animation and color significance is at the forefront of Glass and its hues look better than ever in 1080 pixels on this Warner Bros. Archive Collection Blu-ray release.


Bolstered by the leftover chemistry from their previous project together, with Rod Taylor's research head Bruce Templeton meeting memorably cute not once but twice with Day's Nelson, although it dabbles in multiple genres, Boat is anchored by the burgeoning romance between the two main characters right from the start, which leaves the director plenty of time to play.

Bursting with chase scenes, slapstick, pratfalls, and sight gags galore thanks to the backdrop of scientific research and inventions (not to mention zany combinations of a few courtesy of Tashlin, whose big break came writing gags for the Marx Brothers and Lucille Ball), while Glass flies by quickly as it moves from one comedic bit and another, it loses some of its cohesive charm along the way.


Sacrificing a little of the human connection between not only the leads but the leads and the audience as well in order to squeeze in the next gag, Tashlin's film starts to spin out of his control in an overlong party sequence which fuses together the film's second and third act.

Yet while Boat doesn't always flow — a problem that is magnified on the manufactured on demand Blu-ray which jumps instantly from one chapter to the next as if a few transitional frames disappeared from the transfer — it still remains one of Day's wildest outings and an otherwise entertaining hodgepodge of romance, physical comedy, spy movie action, and song.



Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

Blu-ray Review: The Aspern Papers (2018)


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With three generations of Redgraves linked to three productions of The Aspern Papers, by this point you could say that bringing the gothically romantic Henry James tale to life is officially a Redgrave thing.

Originally published in 1888 and in three parts no less, the novella — inspired by the letters that the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley penned for his wife Mary Shelley's step-sister, Claire Clairmont, which Claire kept until her death — was first brought to the stage by Michael Redgrave in 1959.


Later revived in 1984 in an award-winning production starring Michael's daughter Vanessa Redgrave (opposite Christopher Reeve who acted alongside her in a big-screen Merchant Ivory version of Henry James's The Bostonians also in ‘84), now more than thirty years later, Redgrave gets the chance to bring Papers to life once again.

Changing with the times by taking on a new role in this effort from first time feature filmmaker Julien Landais, which, produced by James Ivory is based on a French scenic adaptation by Jean Pavans, in 2018’s The Aspern Papers Vanessa Redgrave passes the torch to daughter Joely Richardson who slides into her old part.


A sudsy drama about an obsessive American editor, the film stars Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Morton Vint who — using whatever guise and lies are necessary — travels to Venice to track down the letters of his literary idol Jeffrey Aspern.

Posing as a man on holiday, he rents a room from Redgrave's Clairmont inspired Juliana Bordereau and sets out to win over the woman's sheltered, spinster niece Miss Tina (Richardson).


While ordinarily Rhys Meyers can play the role of a seducer in his sleep and make you believe it, he's visibly uncomfortable in Aspern, turning in a performance that's half Lestat from Interview With the Vampire and half Elvis Presley, whom he portrayed to well-deserved acclaim in a 2005 television miniseries. And although yes, I'm aware that he also played Dracula recently on the small screen perhaps, as with Aspern, the less said about that the better.


As disinterested as it is overly strong, Aspern's acting is a mess to say the least and indicative of a much bigger problem, which is the film itself. For in his uncertainty throughout, Rhys Meyers is far from alone.

All three of the film's performances feel like they belong in three entirely different James adaptations. While Redgrave easily dominates as a cross between Gloria Swanson's Norma Desmond and Film Noir era Joan Crawford, Richardson tiptoes quietly around the others, playing her part as though she'd just stepped onstage in The Glass Menagerie.


Filled with clunky, heavy-handed narration and odd moments of Eyes Wide Shut homage that belong in a fragrance ad (which makes sense considering the director's background helming fashion shorts, commercials, and music videos), although the Venetian backdrop is stunning and thespians will relish the opportunity to see the Redgrave family command a scene, this is easily the worst Henry James adaptation I have ever seen.

Unsure just what exactly it is that he wants to say, Landais seems much more interested in using the characters — namely Vint — as a jumping off point to explore his own ideas and identity.


And although it's apparent that Landais is a visual thinker with some kind of story to tell, it's easy to deduce within the first few monologues by the Redgraves who know it best that The Aspern Papers isn't it.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

Blu-ray Review: We Die Young (2019)


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Swapping out Pulp Fiction's handling of Ezekiel 25:17 with the Shylock's Act 1, Scene 3 speech from Merchant of Venice, writer-director Lior Geller's crime movie We Die Young kicks things off like a cinematic cover band looking for new ways to play old hits.

And while it lays this approach on pretty heavily from its informative (if wildly over-the-top) opening voice-over sequence which recalls both Casino and City of God up through the violence that erupts amid a holy celebration in its Godfather style denouement, hang in there long enough and you just might be surprised by how well Young works overall.


Retooling what appears to be the same basic plot of Geller’s award-winning 2007 Israeli short Roads, the filmmaker transfers its story about an ex-soldier's involvement in a fourteen-year-old drug runner's quest to keep his ten year old brother from following in his footsteps to the MS-13 filled streets of Washington D.C.

Haunted by his experiences in Afghanistan, which have left him wounded both physically without the ability to speak and mentally with nightmares, an Oxy habit, and PTSD, Jean-Claude Van Damme's Daniel spends his days working as a neighborhood mechanic just trying to get by.


Finding himself falling back on his old training when he catches sight of Lucas (Elijah Rodriguez) and his younger brother Miguel (Nicholas Sean Johnny) being hunted by the upper echelons of MS-13, he puts everything on the line to get the boys away from the gang and on their way to safety.

Produced by its star Jean-Claude Van Damme, We Die Young gives the actor his best role since 2008's JCVD. Reminiscent of Martin Campbell's underrated 2017 effort The Foreigner, which features a similarly stellar turn by JCVD contemporary Jackie Chan as a humbled man who, wearied by life, decides to act rather than be pushed by the wayside, while Young is easily the B-movie here, the two have so much in common (both onscreen and off) that they work even better together as a double feature.


Underplaying that cocky charisma that fueled some of the movies of his early '90s heyday by relying instead on his strength as an actor (again like Chan in The Foreigner) although the film's breakneck pacing leaves little time to develop its characters, Van Damme lends a sense of gravitas to Daniel that helps give Young a moment to catch its breath.

Similarly excellent in another role that deserves more than just a few expository speeches here and there to literally tell the viewer who he is, how he's connected to the boys, and what that means, The Umbrella Academy's David CastaƱeda shines as Rincon, the "First Word" or head of the gang.


Trying to give his own beloved younger sibling — his disabled sister — a better life away from the streets of D.C. by preparing for her wedding, just like the complicated Daniel, Rincon is proof that Geller isn't content to paint everyone as simply good or evil with the same brush used in the classic westerns which gave birth to gangster fare.

Linking the two sides together courtesy of an out-of-options Lucas, unfortunately there's no way to pay off on all of the supporting players and subplots that Geller hoped to create in a ninety-two minute running time.


While perhaps Roads would be better served adapted yet again as a TV miniseries — particularly to offer more of the Latin American characters greater depth and give the film's many moral and ethical quandaries time to expound upon — miles better than a mere copycat tapestry of contemporary crime movie classics, Young is elevated by well-staged action sequences and one hell of a turn by Van Damme.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

Movie Review: Dogman (2018)


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Undaunted by the sights and sounds of a barking dog snapping his neck forward and baring his fangs in the opening frame, although Marcello (Marcello Fonte) keeps a safe distance at first, once he starts whispering words of encouragement, we quickly realize that this man has never met a dog he couldn't tame.


Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for humans in Gomorrah director Matteo Garrone's brutal Darwinian western Dogman, which finds the sweet-natured dog groomer Marcello (played by Fonte as a cross between Buster Keaton and Roberto Benigni) struggling to keep a leash on Edoardo Pesce's Simone, a mad-dog ex-boxer turned criminal who terrorizes Marcello's small, sleepy southern Italian town.

Selling cocaine on the side to spoil his beloved daughter with expensive vacations and keep his dog in pasta dinners, Marcello's relationship with Simone grows even more precarious as he plays multiple roles in Marcello's life, including best customer and biggest bully.


A true frenemy running hot and cold on Marcello like one of the alpha dogs that gets dropped off at his workplace, instead of luring him into submission with treats, Marcello uses cocaine, not quite understanding that all it does is make Simone feel more emboldened, barking mad, and invincible.

First cornering the dog groomer to act as a getaway driver in a robbery, soon push comes to shove as Simone puts Marcello in an impossible position, forcing him to choose between loyalty to his fellow business owners (who've openly discussed hiring someone to kill Simone) or letting Simone wreak havoc.


Clinging to the false hope that, having been through a lot together, the two admittedly lonely men in an increasingly cynical world share some sort of codependent bond, the film segues into bleak vengeful western territory midway through.

Fixated on the classic genre paradigm of the weak against the strong (and loosely based on a shocking '80s case), in Dogman, Marcello makes one wrong decision after another until the formerly happy-go-lucky man's smile is long gone.


Steeped in symbolism, it's reminiscent at times of a silent movie or rather two completely different silent features cut together. But factoring in Garrone's complete lack of subtlety, the film's existential Camus inspired conclusion fails to land the way it should, coming as it does after Dogman's far more compelling, character-driven first half.

Still a devastating drama elevated by Fonte's captivating, Cannes Film Festival award-winning performance, while Dogman's overwrought final act never feels fully earned, the film, which was Italy's official submission to the Academy Awards for Best Foreign Film is still well worth seeing due to its intriguing blend of classical genres and archetypes that, much like a barking criminal or canine, Dogman nearly tames.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

Movie Review: Wild Nights with Emily (2018)


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A freewheeling, revisionist look at the life of Emily Dickinson, Wild Nights with Emily boldly contradicts the popular narrative of the author as a virginal, reclusive spinster by using her poems and private correspondence to instead focus on the as yet untold story of the poet's romantic relationship with her girlhood friend turned sister-in-law Susan.

With the leads brought wondrously to life by Molly Shannon in the titular role and Susan Ziegler as Dickinson's near-lifelong muse and lover, although playwright turned filmmaker Madeleine Olnek's ambitious third feature struggles to find a consistent tone and rhythm throughout, when Wild Nights trusts in the richness of its biographical storyline, it never fails to weave a fascinating spell.


Initially purporting to be a comedy, the film opts for satirical humor as a counterpoint to its sudden change in point-of-view. Moving freely back-and-forth in time, Wild Nights contrasts Dickinson's actual day-to-day life as a prolific lesbian artist struggling against the small-minded (mostly male) literary gatekeepers of the era with the revised, "sanitized," and sensationalized version of her life put forth by Mabel Loomis Todd (played by Amy Seimetz) twenty years later.

The woman who would posthumously edit and publish Dickinson's work and create the Bronte-esque spinster persona the world would come to know, Todd — whom we discover was the mistress of Emily's brother and Susan's husband — serves as a kind of unreliable narrator throughout the film as well as its overall villain.

Frequently contrasting Todd's false narrative with Dickinson's actions to make a comedic point, Olnek inadvertently undercuts her own vital research. Shortchanging the film's emotional impact for the sake of the script's jokes — save for a few memorable exceptions — when an unfunny exchange goes on for too long or a sightgag doesn't land, the film's wavering, half-serious tone threatens to make us care less about Dickinson's otherwise engrossing life story than Wild's filmic approach.


Winning us over with its romantic arc which culminates in a heartbreaking split-screen image, from its flashbacks to Emily's younger years discovering romantic love through Shakespeare's words to her struggle to see the object of her affection marry her brother Austin (Kevin Seal), contrary to its earliest intentions as a broad comedy, Nights is vastly more successful as a drama infused with situational humor overall.

At times reminiscent of a college thesis project (and indeed, a packet filled with eye-opening articles and supporting material to back up Olnek's claims was made available to press), though bursting with knowledge and passion for the subject, Wild Nights serves up an academically intriguing if ultimately uneven chronicle of Emily Dickinson's life.

While nowhere near as sumptuous or polished as the recent big screen Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion from Terence Davies and starring Cynthia Nixon (regardless of how much it might adhere to Todd's legend), I applaud Olnek's decision to take a fresh, mothball free approach to the genre and especially her pursuit of Dickinson's true identity.


Obviously, a person's sexuality is no one's business but their own. However, given how many of Dickinson's nearly two thousand poems were dedicated to or inspired by Susan, it's vital to read them with that perspective in mind, and doubly so to ascertain just how much damage can be done when someone decides to "erase" a person's past in order to better fit their own prejudicial beliefs as well as their preferred vision for the future.

Needless to say, even if the message is better than the movie, more than one hundred years later, we must thank Olnek (and company) for refusing to be content to let the woman who wrote "I'm Nobody! Who are you?" be anybody except her wild, complex, and wholly original self.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

4/05/2019

Blu-ray Review: Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (2019)


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(FTC Notice: Warner Bros. Home Entertainment provided me with a free copy of the Blu-ray I reviewed in this blog post. The opinions I share are my own.)

Much "more than just a girl" as the lyrics to Emily Bear's catchy Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase title track promises, the eponymous sixteen-year-old budding sleuth played by Sophia Lillis is, as her Aunt Helen (Andrea Anders) describes, as persuasive as her Atticus Finch-like lawyer father (Sam Trammell) and as righteous as her late mother.


An upbeat, girl power fueled adaptation of the second book in the ubiquitous series by Carolyn Keene aka Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson (which was previously turned into a feature film back in 1939), penned by Vampire Diaries and Handmaid's Tale writers Nina Fiore and John Herrera, 2019’s Drew was helmed by Poison Ivy director Katt Shea, who was part of the famous Sundance class of ‘92.

Having only spent summers in her dad's hometown of River Heights before they move there from Chicago following her mother's death, it takes time for the fiercely independent minded Drew to adapt to small town life where she quickly becomes known to the police department after taking on a school bully who'd been targeting one of her best friends.


Realizing that all she's done is stoop to the bully's level, Nancy decides to use her knack for deductive reasoning and the aforementioned traits that her aunt called her "superpowers" for good when she plunges headfirst into a mystery at a spooky old mansion after meeting an elderly resident from one of the town's oldest and most well respected families who swears she's being haunted.

Leaving a few plot strands open, including Nancy's friendship with a young River Heights deputy (Andrew Matthew Welch) who treats her like an equal as well as a reference to the Lilac Inn, which is the fourth mystery in Keane's collection, at times the 89 minute Drew feels like a superbly crafted pilot for a new cable TV or straight-to-disc series of movies.


However, thanks to its breakneck pacing and amazing cast — led by the irrepressibly charming Lillis whose excitement is contagious and great supporting turns by Zoe Renee and Mackenzie Graham as Nancy Drew's best friends George and Bess, as well as Linda Lavin and Laura Wiggins as the two clients at the heart of the mystery — Staircase wins us over enough that you'll definitely be rooting for more installments.

While the surprisingly scary special effects in one early sequence might be a bit too intense for children under the age of ten (especially without parents giving it a look beforehand), kids of other ages should be delighted by this timely, vital, and downright entertaining celebration of independent thinking, justice, friendship, and above all, girls standing up for themselves and each other while doing what is right.


Executive produced by Ellen DeGeneres, the film has been given a high quality transfer to Blu-ray, complete with a few fun Drew fan worthy and kid-friendly extras including a celebration of the heroine's legacy from the cast and crew and a gag reel. Also serving up a DVD and digital copy as part of its combo pack release, Staircase is sure to inspire a new generation of readers to discover the joys of sleuthing with Drew.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I received a review copy of this Blu-ray in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.

Movie Review: The Public (2018)


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As the third floor librarian of the Cincinnati Public Library working in the Social Sciences Department, the fields of psychology, sociology, political science, history, economic, public health, and more are Stuart Goodson's domain.

However, as we see shortly into The Public from writer-director-producer Emilio Estevez (who also plays Goodson), the librarian's experience with these subjects goes far beyond the printed page as everyday his workplace transforms into a veritable homeless shelter, which gives citizens freezing on the streets of Cincinnati a warm place to go for the day.


Bringing awareness to an epidemic that plays out in public libraries across the country, the film, which was inspired by an article that Salt Lake City Public Library Deputy Director Chip Ward wrote for "The Los Angeles Times" in 2007, became a twelve years in the making indie passion project for Estevez.

Without the support of the local government, which instead turns a blind eye to the crisis, Goodson spends his shifts playing the role of friend, social worker, referee, and first-responder to a group of homeless patrons he knows almost as well as the books on the library's shelves, letting instinct and kindness be his guide.


But when a deadly cold front hits Cincinnati and fills every shelter in the area, Goodson finds himself caught in the middle of a righteous act of civil disobedience as a group of roughly one hundred men refuses to leave the warmth of the library at the end of the day.

Taking a few moments to weigh the pros and cons of the action, which arrives in the middle of a frivolous lawsuit against the Cincinnati Public Library, Goodson decides to risk everything and join the men's cause in the hopes that the mayor will sanction the library an emergency shelter for the night.


Having proclaimed that books saved his life, even though he understands they're facing an uphill legal battle, Estevez's aptly named Stuart Goodson knows that as a good son adhering to the rights of the nation's founding fathers in his role as a librarian, sometimes you have to stop stewing in the arts and stand up for what's right.

Filled with symbolism, speechifying, and signposting, The Public wears its heart in each one of cinematographer Just Miguel Azpiroz's frames. And while Estevez raises a number of valid and urgent points from start to finish, I couldn't help but wish that the film would have woven its main thesis into a much more organic narrative tapestry than it ultimately does.


Rather than draw us into The Public with character-driven storytelling, we're repeatedly told how to feel as (even with the best of intentions) Estevez introduces and then abandons important subtopics from the opioid crisis to media manipulation throughout the film's roughly two hour running time.

A work with a lot on its mind and all of it worthy of deeper discussion, the decision to turn Ward's article into a fictional feature is ambitious indeed since — as someone not only passionate about libraries but who also grew up in and around them — I believe there's enough here to warrant an HBO documentary miniseries.


Buoyed by a terrific turn by Estevez (in his strongest role in years), the film boasts a who's who cast of terrific and largely criminally underutilized character actors including Jena Malone, Jeffrey Wright, Christian Slater, Michael Kenneth Williams, Taylor Schilling, Gabrielle Union, and Alec Baldwin that's sure to delight fans.

Though continuing Estevez's great tradition of making socially conscious features like The War at Home and complex Altmanesque ensemble pictures like the masterful BobbyThe Public falls short of those films by too often spelling out key plot points and character reveals as if holding up a sign at a protest rally.

But thanks to Estevez's wise decision to add levity and laughter to the issue to try to appeal to a wider audience, it's one cause we'd be proud to stand up for along with Goodson and The Public since in the end, humanism should be in all of our domains.


Text ©2019, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reserved. http://www.filmintuition.com Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.